Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Study Guide Standing Bear Becomes a Person Summary & Analysis

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In addition to the Nez Perces, Lewis and Clark had also encountered the Poncas Indian tribe during their expedition in 1804. The Poncas tribe had been diminished by an outbreak of smallpox at the time; but by the middle of the nineteenth century, the Poncas are regaining strength and power once more. The Poncas endure the same fate as all other Indian tribes and are moved to the area called the Indian Territory in 1877 as a result of a congressional order. Poncas Chief Standing Bear, along with some other chiefs, travels to the Indian Territory to discuss their situation. When they reject the government offers, the Indian chiefs are denied money or transportation and walk five hundred miles back to their home.

Indian agent Edward C. Kemple waits for the chiefs to return and immediately orders Standing Bear to move...

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This section contains 493 words
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