Women Who Run with the Wolves - Chapter 4, The Mate: Union With the Other Summary & Analysis

Clarissa Pinkola Estés
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Chapter 4, The Mate: Union With the Other Summary and Analysis

This chapter seems somehow deceptive. The author carries on in a tone that blends her roles both as a story teller and a practicing psychologist. The story is nonfiction and objective but is interwoven with the power of story telling. The stories include falsehoods in a design that reveals additional truths. An analogy to this is the way that people can hide and reveal and express themselves through attire.

The first story is named Manawee. Here a man (Manawee) is courting a set of twin daughters. This fellow is not like Bluebeard. The twins have a protective father, who interferes by making it clear that if Manawee is interested in the twins as wives, then he is going to have to put forth the effort to discover their true...

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This section contains 608 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Women Who Run with the Wolves Study Guide
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