F. Scott Fitzgerald Writing Styles in Winter Dreams

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Narration

Fitzgerald employs a third person omniscient narrator in "Winter Dreams," but with an innovative twist. The narrator almost becomes a separate persona in the story, as he occasionally steps back from the plot and speaks directly to the reader, giving his critical perspective on the characters or on the action. Fitzgerald borrows this technique from Joseph Conrad, who, in works like Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim, creates the character Marlow, a seasoned sailor who narrates the story of the main characters through his sometimes subjective perspective. Fitzgerald perfected this technique in The Great Gatsby in the character of Nick Carraway, the naïve Midwesterner whose task it is to pin down the enigmatic Gatsby for his audience.

In "Winter Dreams," Fitzgerald does not name his character, but his presence is felt nevertheless. The first time his voice emerges is at the opening of Part II, where...

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This section contains 418 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Winter Dreams Study Guide
Copyrights
Gale
Winter Dreams from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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