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Henrik Ibsen Writing Styles in The Wild Duck

This Study Guide consists of approximately 97 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Wild Duck.
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Style

Symbolism

The wild duck is the foremost symbol Ibsen employs. The wild duck has come to live with the family after having been shot by Hakon, which in itself is symbolic. Hakon is the instrument of the duck's downfall, just as he was the instrument of Gina's downfall. Both duck and woman almost came to destruction. In the case of the duck, Hakon's dog saved the creature; in the case of Gina, Hakon's money saved her from disgrace. For Gregers, however, the duck, which became caught amidst the mire and rubbish at the lake bottom, comes to represent the Ekdal family: Gina; Old Ekdal, who according to Hakon is one of those people who "dive to the bottom the moment they get a couple of slugs in their body, and never come to the surface again"; and Hjalmar, who according to Gregers has "something of the wild duck" in...

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This section contains 840 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Wild Duck Study Guide
Copyrights
The Wild Duck from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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