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Wendy Rose Writing Styles in For the White poets who would be Indian

This Study Guide consists of approximately 62 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of For the White poets who would be Indian.
This section contains 359 words
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Style

Free Verse

"For the White poets who would be Indian" is written in free verse and is a brief poem, not only in terms of its twenty-eight lines but in the relative shortness of those lines as well. Here, the form complements the simple, somewhat calm, direct address from the poet to her supposed adversaries, and, too, it reflects the poignant, down-to-earth lifestyle of most Native Americans. But simplicity does not imply artlessness. This little poem is full of staunch imagery and a compelling voice that is made stronger by its succinct, halted cadence throughout. Read the poem slowly, stopping at each line break, and notice the repetitive "drumming" effect, how the lines—including those made up of only one word—tend to sound almost dull and heavy-laden. Lines such as "our tongues," "turn holy," "of our souls," "become / primitive," and "and go back" are especially loaded with both...

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This section contains 359 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our For the White poets who would be Indian Study Guide
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For the White poets who would be Indian from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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