The Whipping Boy Social Sensitivity

Sid Fleischman
This Study Guide consists of approximately 35 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Whipping Boy.
This section contains 178 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Whipping Boy Study Guide

When he read about whipping boys in the course of his research, Fleischman felt an indignation that kept him working at a difficult project. He felt he had to tell the story of a whipping boy and his prince because he believed that both were victims of institutionalized injustice. The prince was a victim of excess privilege, the whipping boy had no privilege at all.

Throughout history children have been victimized. A child like Jemmy is particularly helpless because of his poverty. But Fleischman's sympathy extends to children of all classes who are powerless to defend themselves.

Through his position as whipping boy, Jemmy comes to understand why Prince Horace is so bored. Neither the energy nor the imagination of a growing boy are given adequate scope under his princely restrictions.

Fleischman drew some of his material from Henry Mayhew's London Labour and the London Poor. While this...

(read more from the Social Sensitivity section)

This section contains 178 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Whipping Boy Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Whipping Boy from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.