Where the Red Fern Grows Social Sensitivity

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In choosing the river bottoms of the Ozark Mountains as his setting, Rawls creates a sensitivity to rural life in the early part of the twentieth century. Where the Red Fern Grows not only tells a good tale, but this story also preserves the strong, proud, and determined spirit of the people of this place and time.

Although the focus of the story is Billy Coleman and his devotion to his coon dogs, the story allows the reader, through Billy's eyes, to view the family structure, values, and customs present in this rural farming community. It is a virginal state with sparse settlements and few social institutions.

Rawls' portrayal of life in the mountains is in direct contrast to the life of the average reader. An example of the contrast is seen when Billy goes to Tahlequah to pick up his dogs. He is stared at, laughed at...

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This section contains 277 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Where the Red Fern Grows Study Guide
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