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When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Chapter Summary & Analysis - The Second World War and After Summary

Paula Giddings
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This section contains 342 words
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The Second World War and After Summary and Analysis

A study reveals that working married women are forced to work because their husbands do not make enough to support the family. Unions are formed. Both Black and White women participate in successful strikes. As World War II looms, opportunities in the defense industries provide more money and better conditions for many working women, though not often for Black women or even Black men. Roosevelt's commitment to equal rights wanes and Blacks are unemployed in record numbers. Much of the opposition to Black employment in the defense industry is from White women who fear their domestic help will leave in favor of the factory jobs.

There's a general lessening of interest in Black organizations and it seems the new generation of members take social rather than activists' roles. Black women are especially torn as men...

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This section contains 342 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Study Guide
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When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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