Forgot your password?  

When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Chapter Summary & Analysis - Black Braintrusters Summary

Paula Giddings
This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of When and Where I Enter.
This section contains 339 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Study Guide

Black Braintrusters Summary and Analysis

Franklin D. Roosevelt, elected President in 1932, is not a proponent of Black rights. The relief acts put in place after the Great Depression are not equal. In 1934, Eleanor Roosevelt becomes active in the issue prompting change among those in power to enact it. Blacks support FDR's second term and Roosevelt begins appointing Blacks to specific roles in the government, including Cabinet divisions. These appointments are called "Black Braintrusters" or "the Black Cabinet," and Mary McLeod Bethune is among the appointments. As the first woman appointed to such a position, Bethune refuses to allow others to ignore the significance of the appointment.

Bethune and others believe there are advantages to remaining segregated including the fact that Blacks can more readily oversee the needs of Blacks than Whites who believe themselves sympathetic. It's noted that one of her faults is that she's sometimes willing to...

(read more from the Black Braintrusters Summary)

This section contains 339 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Study Guide
Copyrights
When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook