When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America - The Radical Interracialists Summary & Analysis

Paula Giddings
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By 1919, there's an increased spirit of defiance among Blacks as a whole. Zora Neal Hurston, a student at Howard University, is angered when the school's White president apologizes for having a book advocating social equality in the school's library. The concept of the New Negro is introduced as new social goals emerge.

There is increased hostility between Black and White suffragists. When the right to vote is granted, Black women rush out in droves to register. The movement meets with opposition that is noted to be the same as efforts to disenfranchise Black men. Black women begin entering efforts to address the race issue as opposed to former efforts related to the women's issue. It's noted that this lesson probably eliminates the idea that women's issues are more important than race.

During one particular conflict, the minutes of the meeting...

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This section contains 190 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America Study Guide
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