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Marie Howe Writing Styles in What Belongs to Us

Marie Howe
This Study Guide consists of approximately 25 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of What Belongs to Us.
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Style

List

By constructing the poem as a list, Howe is able to evoke ideas and emotions through repetition. Auxesis is the cataloging of a series that closes at the zenith, or high point, of the set. In Howe's case, that "zenith" of the set is her own pain. Not even it belongs to her. In its structure, Howe's poem also resembles a litany. Litanies can be prayers consisting of a series of invocations or supplications, or more simply a repetitive chant. Another prayer-like element of the poem is its focus on the relationship between mind and body. Other poets who have used lists extensively in their poetry to comment on mind-body issues include Walt Whitman, Allen Ginsberg, Diane Wakoski, and Mark Strand.

Tone

The tone of Howe's poem is elegiac. Elegies are poems or songs that mourn the loss of something or someone. Although "What Belongs to Us" doesn't...

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This section contains 302 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our What Belongs to Us Study Guide
Copyrights
What Belongs to Us from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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