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Ernest Hemingway Writing Styles in A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

This Study Guide consists of approximately 97 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Clean, Well-Lighted Place.
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Style

Minimalism

A short story as glaringly brief and simplified as this one is rightly called "minimalist" in its aesthetics (the word aesthetics refers to how the author tells his or her story). It uses the minimum building blocks necessary to accomplish the job of telling a story. Hemingway uses simple diction, usually monosyllabic words of Anglo-Saxon, as opposed to Latin, origin. Grammatically, he uses simple as opposed to complex sentences. There is little figurative language—no metaphor or simile, for example. Character and plot are minimized. These three characters do not even have names. All that happens is that the two waiters talk, the old man drinks, and then they all go home.

Repetition

It is very clear to the reader what Hemingway does not do in this minimalist short story, but what does he do? One thing he does beyond the narrative minimum is repeat, or repeat...

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This section contains 434 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Clean, Well-Lighted Place Study Guide
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A Clean, Well-Lighted Place from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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