The Way of the World Criticism

This Study Guide consists of approximately 83 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Way of the World.
This section contains 641 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Way of the World Study Guide

The Way of the World is considered one of the finest examples of late seventeenth-century Restoration drama during the period when the comedy of manners flourished in England. Congreve had written two extremely popular dramas before this, Love for Love (1695) and The Mourning Bride (1697), which received rave reviews in London and cemented his reputation as a major playwright. However, his next and final play, The Way of the World, was only a marginal success when it was performed in 1700. Several theories have been forwarded as to why audience reaction at the time was lukewarm. One of Congreve's biographers, Bonamy Dobráee, speculates that, while Congreve's masterpiece must be appreciated for "depth and sympathy of its characterization . . . together with the general sense of what is precious in life, and the magnificent handling of language," the play might have been "too subtle." A character like Witwoud, he notes, is...

(read more from the Critical Overview section)

This section contains 641 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Way of the World Study Guide
Copyrights
Drama for Students
The Way of the World from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.