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The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 Social Sensitivity

Christopher Paul Curtis
This Study Guide consists of approximately 50 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963.
This section contains 140 words
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Social Sensitivity

Kenny is growing up at the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement, and although his home is far from the marches, protests, and violence that ensue, Curtis weaves the two together seamlessly. The Watsons' reaction to the bombing is one of horror, confusion, and disbelief. By helps Kenny gain perspective on his feelings, and the statements he makes help the reader gain some perspective, too.

Kenny, things ain't ever going to be fair.

How's it fair that two grown men could hate Negroes so much that they'd kill some kids just to stop them from going to school? How's it fair that even though the cops down there might know who did it nothing will probably ever happen to those men? It ain't. But you just gotta understand that that's the way it is and keep on stepping.

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This section contains 140 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 Study Guide
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The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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