Washington's Crossing - Study Guide Two Councils Summary & Analysis

David Hackett Fischer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Washington's Crossing.
This section contains 517 words
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That night after the battle for the bridge, Cornwallis ordered his men outside to keep tabs on the Americans. Their objective was to watch the enemy and to keep American patrols from discovering the positions of British and Hessian units. Cornwallis attempted an attack on the American front, but the Americans knew what he was up to. Washington was sure to defend his troops and ward off their attackers. They were outnumbered five to one by Cornwallis' regiments.

While those preparations were going on, Cornwallis and Washington met with their respective councils of war. Each took a very different approach to decision making. Cornwallis had a large army and a smaller council. Washington had a smaller army and a larger council. While Washington's meeting was a council, Cornwallis' was more of a court. In his council, Cornwallis was a ruler more than he...

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This section contains 517 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Washington's Crossing Study Guide
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