Forgot your password?  
Study Guide

Literary Qualities of The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

This Study Guide consists of approximately 66 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The War of the Worlds.
This section contains 272 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The War of the Worlds Study Guide

Literary Qualities

At the time Wells wrote The War of the Worlds, science had become the subject of much public debate. During this period, the natural sciences were becoming part of the everyday curriculum of schools. Journalists responded to the general interest in science—and the particular interest in Mars and its possible inhabitants—with a multitude of speculations. Wells chose a topic for his novel that was calculated to catch the public's imagination. In addition, his care in presenting accurate details, both in setting and about the everyday lives of his characters, gives the narrative a powerful immediacy, as though the action could be taking place in any reader's own yard.

An interesting technique is Wells's use of symbolic names. The Narrator could be an Everyman figure—a character who is meant to symbolize all human beings.

More pointedly symbolic are the Curate and the Artilleryman...

(read more from the Literary Qualities section)

This section contains 272 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The War of the Worlds Study Guide
Copyrights
The War of the Worlds from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook