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The War Correspondent Historical Context

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In 1853, war broke out between an expansionist Russia and a declining Turkish empire (known as the Ottoman Empire). Russia’s initial actions, including the invasion of the Baltic provinces of Moldavia and Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and the destruction of the Turkish fleet at Sinope, aroused opposition in Britain and France. Britain viewed Russian control of the eastern Mediterranean and possible expansion into Afghanistan as a threat to its interests in India. France was an ally of Turkey, and under Emperor Napoleon III (reigned as emperor, 1852–1870) was keen to show its imperial ambitions. Britain and France therefore declared war on Russia in March 1854.

British and French forces camped at Varna in Bulgaria during the spring and summer of 1854 while Turkish forces engaged the Russians a hundred miles to the north. The Russians withdrew from the Balkan provinces, and the British and French forces...

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This section contains 1,128 words
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