Walden - Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 64 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Walden.
This section contains 356 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Walden Study Guide

Chapter 15 Summary

The principal subject of the fifteenth chapter is very apparent in the chapter's title. In "Winter Animals," Thoreau does indeed describe the behavior of various winter animals in their habitats as he observed them. The portraits ultimately suggest that there was a connection between Thoreau and these animals that inhabited the area surrounding Walden Pond.

Thoreau introduces the subject of the animals by referring to the sounds he heard at night, which included the sound of an owl hooting. Interestingly, Thoreau introduces the concept of the common language of Walden by giving the Latin term, "lingua vernacular," which means common language. The effect of quoting the term in Latin is clear: the quotation thus emulates the meaning; in the context that Thoreau applies it at least.

The next animal that Thoreau mentions is the fox. The fox, Thoreau writes, "Ranged over the...

(read more from the Chapter 15 Summary)

This section contains 356 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Walden Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
Walden from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.