Walden Two - Chapters 13-16 Summary & Analysis

B. F. Skinner
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Chapters 13-16 Summary

Children from one to three have communal playrooms and sleeping quarters similar to those for babies. They also wear only diapers. As some children leave for a picnic, Castle asks if the other children get jealous. Mrs. Nash is confused, not understanding what he means. After they leave, Frazier explains that Mrs. Nash came to Walden Two at twelve and no longer experiences jealousy. Neither do the young children. Barbara and Castle object to the elimination of emotions, and Frazier says they only eliminate unnecessary, harmful emotions. Anger, jealousy, hate, and sorrow are unnecessary and unproductive. Frazier attributes this to "behavioral engineering."

Frazier explains his theory that society creates competition by enculturating children at a young age. Walden Two created a cooperative code of conduct. Through experimentation, Frazier developed means of educating children to internalize the ethics, including leaving a child with a sugar-covered lollipop...

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This section contains 711 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Walden Two Study Guide
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