Samuel Beckett Writing Styles in Waiting for Godot

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The seemingly endless waiting that Estragon and Vladimir undertake for the mysterious Godot has made Beckett's play one of the classic examples of what is called Theatre of the Absurd. The term refers both to its content a bleak vision of the human condition and to the style that expresses that vision. The idea that human life lacks meaning and purpose, that humans live in an indifferent or hostile universe, is frequently associated with Existentialist writers like the French philosophers Albert Camus (Kam-oo) and Jean-Paul Sartre (Sart). But when these two writers expounded their ideas in novels and plays, they generally used traditional literary techniques that is, life-like characters; clear, linear plots; and conventional dialogue. But with writers like Beckett or the French dramatist Eugene lonesco (E-on-es-co), the style is not an arbitrary choice but rather a necessary complement to the vision itself.

Beckett and...

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This section contains 852 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Waiting for Godot Study Guide
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Waiting for Godot from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.