Virtue Summary & Study Guide

This Study Guide consists of approximately 24 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Virtue.
This section contains 1,109 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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Lines 1-4

Herbert begins “Virtue” with an apostrophe, or invocation. That is, here, he starts with a direct rhetorical address to a personified thing: as if speaking to the day, the narrator says, “Sweet day” and then characterizes the day as “cool,” “calm,” and “bright.” Thus, for one noun, “day,” he provides four adjectives. The rest of the line is made up of the adverbial “so,” signifying intensity, repeated three times. Herbert is presenting a fairly generic image, without any action, as no verb appears among these eight words. Nor can a verb be found in the next line, which is a kind of appositive, or a noun phrase placed beside the noun that it describes. “The bridal of the earth and sky,” which describes the “day,” indicates no action, instead merely illustrating and amplifying the conditions depicted in the first line. That is, the “sweet day” is...

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This section contains 1,109 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Virtue Study Guide
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