To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time Summary & Study Guide

Robert Herrick
This Study Guide consists of approximately 24 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time.
This section contains 511 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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Lines 1-4

In the opening stanza, the poet articulates the carpe diem tenet that urges one to "Seize the Day." The gathering of roses is a metaphor for living life to the fullest. The image of roses suggests a number of things: roses symbolize sensuality and the fulfillment of earthly pleasures; as vegetation, they are tied to the cycles of nature and represent change and the transience of life. Like the "virgins," the roses are buds, fresh, youthful and brimming with life; youth, like life, however, is fleeting. Marked by brevity, life is such that one day one experiences joy, as suggested by the smiling flower, and the next day death. The poet underscores the ephemeral quality of human life. Like the rose, the virgins whom the speaker addresses, and beyond them the reader of the text, are destined to follow the same fate as the rose.

Lines 5-8

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This section contains 511 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time Study Guide
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Poetry for Students
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.