Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society - Chapter 3, Honor and the Virtues of Autonomy Summary & Analysis

Lila Abu-Lughod
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Bedouins determine status and social hierarchy based on autonomy and freedom. People who do not depend on any other households, tribes, or outside groups are the most autonomous, and therefore they have the highest status. This principle is also seen within households as women try to minimize their dependence on men by asserting themselves in appropriate ways and hiding their weaknesses and emotions.

Clients are people who are often without resources or from a poor lineage who attach themselves to a more powerful tribe or household. In exchange for work, socialization, and good society, clients and their families serve the household by herding sheep, building houses, caring for crops, and helping out with social functions. Patrons provide clients with a place to live, money for food, and clothing for special occasions.

Autonomy is...

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This section contains 534 words
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