Vanity Fair - Chapter 33 Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 33 Summary

Back in Brighton, Matilda reads in the paper of Rawdon's gallantry in battle. He has been promoted, and his aunt merely comments that it is a shame he married so low. His new rank would have enabled him to marry quite well. Colonel Crawley is no closer to getting Matilda's money. Right after his promotion, Becky, acting as Rawdon, sends his aunt a box of war mementos. Becky (in Rawdon's name) asks to keep writing to her once the army marches to Paris.

Mrs. Bute is miserable at her defeat with Matilda. She fears for the inheritance when she reads of Rawdon's promotion. Sir Pitt has become a stumbling drunk since Becky's departure. He mingles with the peasants who rent from him, much to the embarrassment of Pitt junior. The two girls have been sent away to boarding school by Pitt junior, who now runs all the...

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This section contains 338 words
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Vanity Fair from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.