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Vancouver Lights Criticism

This Study Guide consists of approximately 22 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Vancouver Lights.
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Birney began writing poetry in earnest after the outbreak of World War II. In a burst of creative energy he wrote many of the poems that would be included in  David and  Other  Poems,   his   first collection. "Vancouver Lights" was one of these. Peter Aichinger writes that it is "one of the few poems Birney ever wrote that expresses any sort of pride or satisfaction in the human race and its accomplishments." Aichinger believes that the poem "suggests the cyclical pattern in the affairs of men, of grand achievement followed by wretched disaster. It is an expression of pride in man's ability to raise a Camelot at the same time that it acknowledges the probable victory of the forces of darkness in man's spirit." Frank Davey in Earle Birney sees "Vancouver Lights" as an indicator of Birney's own movement away from...

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This section contains 343 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Vancouver Lights Study Guide
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Poetry for Students
Vancouver Lights from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.