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Unnatural Death: Confessions of a Medical Examiner - Chapter 4-6 Summary & Analysis

Michael Baden
This Study Guide consists of approximately 31 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Unnatural Death.
This section contains 1,159 words
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Chapter 4-6 Summary and Analysis

Chapter four deals with the history of medical examiners. The first mention of the office of coroner is in 1194. In those days the reason for needing a coroner was to make sure the person who had die did not commit suicide. If this was the case, any material belonging to the dead person would go to the king. The coroner was more or less a tax collector. He was not even in the medical field, his only qualification needed to be loyalty to the king. This was the case for many years. The coroner was not paid in most cases and if he was, it was not much. The whole idea of autopsies was a grotesque concept and forbidden by religion. The first recorded autopsy is performed in 1665, when Franis Carpenter beats his servant, Samuell Yeoungman in the head. Yeoungman dies two days...

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This section contains 1,159 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Unnatural Death: Confessions of a Medical Examiner Study Guide
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Unnatural Death: Confessions of a Medical Examiner from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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