Uncommon Therapy: The Psychiatric Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. - Study Guide Chapter 8, Weaning Parents from Children Summary & Analysis

Jay Haley
This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Uncommon Therapy.
This section contains 432 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Uncommon Therapy: The Psychiatric Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. Study Guide

Haley begins this chapter by explaining that the way therapy is conducted has progressed in a leap. Erickson signifies the change from recognizing that problems within a family are just that. Individuals who exhibit symptoms and are the one to turn up at a therapists, or in severe cases, to be institutionalized are typically not the entire or actual problem. The 19th-century method was simply to treat a patient on an individual basis. The therapists noticed that there was something else going on; here Mesmer and Freud are used as examples, in cases where one or more parents would interfere or remove the patient from therapy once improvements were effected. Erickson in the 20th century insists on addressing the actual problem and asserts the right to include other individuals who are part of the trouble. Erickson goes...

(read more from the Chapter 8, Weaning Parents from Children Summary)

This section contains 432 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Uncommon Therapy: The Psychiatric Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Uncommon Therapy: The Psychiatric Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.