The Turn of the Screw - Chapter 16 Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 16 Summary

Expecting remonstrations from the children, the governess was disappointed with silence. Mrs. Grose also did not inquire about her absence from church. On later questioning, Mrs. Grose admitted that the children had told her not to say anything because the governess would surely prefer silence on the matter. She went on to tell Mrs. Grose she had returned to the house for a talk with Miss Jessel, and that the latter had said that she suffered. The governess again knew that the specter was after Flora. She had decided to contact the uncle at last.

Chapter 16 Analysis

The children are again controlling the situation by not acting as the governess would have thought. They even control Mrs. Grose, directing her not to mention the governess's absence from church.

The governess's portrayal of her flight as having the purpose of having a talk with...

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This section contains 202 words
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The Turn of the Screw from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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