Geoffrey Chaucer Writing Styles in Troilus and Criseyde

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Point of View

Troilus and Criseyde is a story that takes place in ancient times and has been told before by other authors. Chaucer positions himself as an interpreter of the story for his contemporary courtly medieval audience. He borrows the story from previous authors, notably Boccaccio, which he openly acknowledges within the poem itself, pointing out where his source fails to elaborate on a point and where he is inserting his own interpretation.

Chaucer is himself a member of the court class, and the culture he assigns to ancient Troy seems to reflect the ideals and point of view of him and his fellow courtesans regarding the nature of love and the chivalrous ideals of courtly love. Being true to one's cause and keeping one's word are central to these ideals, and these are important plot points in the tale. Troilus remains true to his word as a...

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This section contains 989 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Troilus and Criseyde Study Guide
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