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To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Critical Essay #2

This Study Guide consists of approximately 85 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.
This section contains 2,258 words
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Critical Essay #2

In the following excerpt, Johnson explores the role of stories, art, and other forms of communication in Lee's novel.

The subject of To Kill a Mockingbird is also song, that is, expression, reading and literacy; both overt and covert attempts at articulation; and communicative art forms, including the novel itself. The particulars of setting in the novel are children's books, grade school texts, many different local newspapers and national news magazines, law books, a hymnal, and the reading aloud of Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe. Much of the novel's action is actually reading, for as the locals and the children believe, that is Atticus Finch's only activity. These expressions are not only attempts to have the self broadcast and realized; more significantly, they are attempts to establish connections beyond or through boundaries.

Contrary to the notion that language and art are cold (for example, the Dracula theme frequently expresses...

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This section contains 2,258 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our To Kill a Mockingbird Study Guide
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To Kill a Mockingbird from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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