To Da-duh in Memoriam Essay

This Study Guide consists of approximately 40 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of To Da-duh in Memoriam.
This section contains 4,213 words
(approx. 11 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the To Da-duh in Memoriam Study Guide

In the following essay, Japtok explores "the intertwining of the forces of nature with the forces of human-shaped time" present in "To Da-Duh, in Memoriam."

There might not be a region of the world that reflects the history of colonialism in its various phases in a more direct way than does the Caribbean. Its very population is a direct result of the African slave trade, European migration, and later immigration from various parts of mostly the British empire, while little is left of the indigenous Arawaks or Caribs. The Caribbean ecology has been forever changed by the plants, animals, and agricultural methods imposed by Europe; in addition, the soil depletion characteristic of a number of West Indian islands directly results from the monocultural economy of the plantation system. The multi-lingualism of the West Indies mirrors the various participants in and stages of European colonialism—Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch...

(read more)

This section contains 4,213 words
(approx. 11 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the To Da-duh in Memoriam Study Guide
Copyrights
Gale
To Da-duh in Memoriam from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook