Additional Resources for To Build a Fire by Jack London

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Barker, James H. Always Getting Ready/Upterrlainarluta: Yup'ik Eskimo Subsistence in Southwest Alaska, University of Washington Press, 1993.

A collection of contemporary interviews and photographs of Yup'ik Eskimos who make their living on the delta of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. According to Jack London, the Yukon River was part of the main route for prospectors during the Klondike Gold Rush of 1897.

Barltrop, Robert. "The Materials of Fame," in his Jack London: The Man, the Writer, the Rebel, Pluto Press, 1976, pp. 179-91.

Acknowledging that London has produced many badly written "pot-boilers," Barltrop asserts that "To Build a Fire" is one of London's "outstanding" stories. On the basis of such excellent stories and considering his popularity with readers, Barltrop concludes that London's reputation as a writer cannot be dismissed by literary critics.

Berton, Pierre. Klondike: The Last Great Gold Rush, 1896- 1899, McClelland and Stewart Inc., rev. ed., 1987.

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This section contains 876 words
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To Build a Fire from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.