Ernest Hemingway Writing Styles in To Have and Have Not

This Study Guide consists of approximately 53 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of To Have and Have Not.
This section contains 1,404 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the To Have and Have Not Study Guide

Point of View

Ernest Hemingway varies the point of view frequently in To Have and Have Not. In Part 1, protagonist Harry Morgan's speaks in the first person, assuming a reader who is familiar with the Cuban waterfront and Gulf Stream. In Part 3, Morgan meditates about the situation he has gotten himself into with Cuban revolutionaries, and how he must think constantly and make no mistakes.

Part 2 is told in the third person omniscient by a neutral narrator. Dialog between Morgan and his ship mate, Wesley, fills much of the three chapters. Part 3 has mixed narration, opening with Albert Tracy describing a meeting with four Cubans. That they are Tracy's reflections is carefully noted; Tracy is destined to die on the ill-fated voyage, so this gives him his say. Morgan's meditation follows, setting up the danger of the mission. The anonymous third-person narrator then takes over for the second half...

(read more)

This section contains 1,404 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the To Have and Have Not Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
To Have and Have Not from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.