Thunderhead (Arc of a Scythe) Quotes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 59 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Thunderhead.
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The world is a flower I hold in my palm. I would end my own existence rather than crush it.
-- Thunderhead (chapter 1)

Importance: The Thunderhead demonstrates that its ultimate goal is to care for humanity. It acknowledges that humanity’s continued existence is delicate and it plans to save the species at all costs.

Death and disfigurement had been replaced by revival and reprimand.
-- Narrator (chapter 10)

Importance: Greyson’s narration comments on the way people’s perceptions of death have changed since death became impermanent. Now, rebellious kids can go deadish any time they want, only for their parents to revive and scold them; whereas in the Age of Mortality, a human life was much more valued and its loss more upsetting.

The aura of prejudice was palpable.
-- Narrator (chapter 11)

Importance: Greyson notes that people view him differently once the Thunderhead marks him as unsavory. Initially, this biased treatment bothers him because it is based entirely on his label...

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This section contains 659 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Thunderhead (Arc of a Scythe) Study Guide
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