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Literary Precedents for Thunderball

This Study Guide consists of approximately 48 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Thunderball.
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Literary Precedents

Criminal mastermind Blofeld is reminiscent of the coldly calculating crime lord Dr. Moriarty of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. Both regard murder as merely a tactic in their contests against the forces of good; both lead international criminal organizations; and both are terrorists.

Almost from the moment of the detonations of atomic bombs on Japan, nuclear weapons became an important theme in popular literature. Science fiction authors in particular made stories about the aftermath of nuclear war a commonplace of fiction in the 1950s.

In 1957, English novelist Nevil Shute, then living in Australia, published On the Beach ; it was an international sensation. Like Thunderball, it capitalized on the public's fears about nuclear weapons — this time by speculating on the potential effects of nuclear war.

However, the focus on the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists was unusual when Thunderball was published.

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This section contains 145 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Thunderball Study Guide
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Thunderball from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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