Susan Campbell Bartoletti Writing Styles in They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group

Susan Campbell Bartoletti
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Perspective

They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group is written in the third person and is the history book it claims to be. Bartoletti's narrative is exciting and alive as she lets the reader see things through her eyes. While it is factual non-fiction, she uses many of fiction's skills to make the story very readable. It draws the reader into the story and makes history very real. Obviously the writer is for Civil Rights. She points out that the KKK is a terrorist group. She is in favor of getting rid of hate crimes.

Tone

While the reader can tell simply by the facts that the author is giving us that she is not in favor of terrorist groups, Bartoletti seems careful to give us the facts without personal commentary. The author gives plenty of stories which show the Klan for...

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This section contains 451 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group Study Guide
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