The Woman Who Had Two Navels - A Portrait of the Artist as a Filipino: Scenes Two & Three Summary & Analysis

Joaquin, Nick
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Summary

The second scene begins again with an older Bitoy retelling previous events, explaining how though his childhood visits to the Marasigan household were part of an era marked by "tranquil innocence" (348), as he grew older and faced severe economic hardships he came to "despise" (348) the Marasigan's seemingly easy life compared to his. As he entered the 1940s, Bitoy became devoted to seeking the truth of the world, no longer tempted by the gilded "lies" (349) of his childhood. However, after his visit to the Marasigan's depicted in the first act, Bitoy feels as a significant transformation and reconnection with his youth.

The scene reveals the eldest two Marasigan children, Manolo and Pepang, in their family home. They are waiting for Candida and Paula, who Manolo notes "get crazier every day" (351). Don Lorenzo is in his...

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This section contains 2,241 words
(approx. 6 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Woman Who Had Two Navels Study Guide
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