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Study Guide

Haruki Murakami Writing Styles in The Wind-up Bird Chronicle

This Study Guide consists of approximately 150 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Wind-up Bird Chronicle.
This section contains 1,757 words
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Style

Point of View

The majority of the novel is narrated by the main protagonist, Toru Okada; however, the author uses point of view deftly, especially in terms of the characters' use various media to communicate with one another. Kumiko, along with May Kasahara, Lieutenant Mamiya and Cinnamon Akasaka, all connect with Toru through the written word. The women and Mamiya all write him letters. Furthermore, Kumiko and Cinnamon Akasaka interact with Toru by computer. To begin, May Kasahara's letters are intended to establish closeness between two neighbors who become friends of a sort. Conversely, Kumiko's written messages are specifically intended to maintain and/or increase the distance between Toru and herself. Similarly, Lieutenant Mamiya writes letters to Toru Okada in part to provide a written eyewitness account of the Manchurian conflicts. More significant than this, however, is Mamiya's desire to share part of Japan's true history with those younger...

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This section contains 1,757 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Wind-up Bird Chronicle Study Guide
Copyrights
The Wind-up Bird Chronicle from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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