John Muir Writing Styles in The Wild Muir: Twenty-two of John Muir's Greatest Adventures

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Perspective

John Muir's perspective is a complex mix of naturalist, conservationist, and spiritualist. Muir's naturalism is obvious. He is deeply interested in taking note of different forms of plant and animal life. He is a major nature lover. In fact, for several decades, Muir spends most of his time alone in the wilderness taking significant risks to encounter nature in new and beautiful ways. He takes extensive notes and sketches of the geography and life he encounters. Muir often prefers nature to anything man-made and relies on very little human technology. He hates cities and thinks that both city air and life have a deleterious effect on his health.

Muir's conservationism grows out of his love of nature. At a few times in the book, Muir expresses a deep desire to preserve nature uninterrupted by human life. He enjoys and even loves pure natural scenes and interacts with only...

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This section contains 759 words
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Buy The Wild Muir: Twenty-two of John Muir's Greatest Adventures Study Guide
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