The Trial and Death of Socrates: Four Dialogues - Dialogue 2, Part 2 Summary & Analysis

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Dialogue 2, Part 2 Summary and Analysis

"The Apology," cont'd. As he continues arguing his innocence, Socrates suggests that the actions of Meletus and his other accusers are a greater crime than his, in that they are striving to "unjustly [take] away the life of another..." He also reminds his listeners that he has conversed with the older men of Athens (naming several, including Plato) as well as with the youth. Finally, Socrates contrasts himself with the man who brings his family to court to gain its sympathy. He reminds the court that he too has a family, but that to bring them into the trial would be a discredit to himself and the court - it would suggest that he is unable to defend himself on his own merits, and that the court would be unable to decide the case on those same merits. "There...

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This section contains 680 words
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