The Thirteenth Tale - Part One, Beginnings: Dickens's Study, The Almanacs, In the Archives of the Banbury Herald, Ruins, The Friendly Giant, and Graves, Summary & Analysis

Diane Setterfield
This Study Guide consists of approximately 53 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Thirteenth Tale.
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Margaret spends the evening transcribing the day's story, thinking about the twins and the other characters in the story, wondering what will happen now that Isabelle is gone. Margaret finds it interesting that Miss Winter never uses the pronoun I when telling her story and wonders why. While Margaret is thinking of this, Judith comes and tells her that Miss Winter would like to see her. Miss Winter talks to Margaret about a picture of Dickens in his study with all his works floating around his head and compares her creative talents to that picture. Miss Winter explains that her stories, her work, have kept her past at bay, but now she feels driven to tell the story of her past, of a particular young girl, because she no longer has work to distract her and feels it is time. Miss Winter tells Margaret this to stress how important it...

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This section contains 1,024 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Thirteenth Tale Study Guide
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