The Theory of the Leisure Class - The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Theory of the Leisure Class.
This section contains 642 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Theory of the Leisure Class Study Guide

"To the end that suitable habits of thought on certain heads may be conserved in the incoming generation, a scholastic discipline is sanctioned by the common sense of the community and incorporated into the accredited scheme of life" (Chap. 14, p. 363). Education results in the formation of habits and thoughts, and this has an economic value for the community. These different values are imparted by the institution and contribute to the doctrine of pecuniary merit. These institutions are where the ideals of the leisure class are learned and passed on to the culture.

Learning, according to Veblen, is closely related to observance of devotional functions. Learning is considered to be a form of vicarious leisure and is tied to the supernatural agent which he has discussed in previous...

(read more from the The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture Summary)

This section contains 642 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Theory of the Leisure Class Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Theory of the Leisure Class from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.