The Theory of the Leisure Class - Chapter 1 Introduction Summary & Analysis

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"The institution of a leisure class is found in its best development at the higher stages of the barbarian culture; as, for instance, in feudal Europe or feudal Japan. In such communities the distinction between classes is very rigorously observed; and the feature of most striking economic significance in these class differences is the distinction maintained between the employments proper to the several classes" (Chap. 1, p. 1). The upper classes did not hold industrial positions but only positions with prestige associated with them. The honorable occupations included warfare and the ministry.

India, with its rigid caste system, has many different social groupings, among which is a leisure class. The class structure resulted in different occupations for different castes. Again, the groups considered to be the leisure class work in non-industrial occupations. In Polynesia and Iceland, there were different classes. The lower classes worked at manual labor. In these societies, men from...

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This section contains 546 words
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