The Sonnets - Section 13: Summary & Analysis

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Section 13: Summary

Sonnet 141: The poet says he loves his lady not with his eyes, though she is beautiful, but with his heart whose five senses only want to serve her. His reward for being led into sin with her is nothing but pain.

Sonnet 142: Shakespeare tells his lady that she should consider her own behavior before she reproaches him for being unfaithful, since she herself has "robbed others' beds" and profaned her scarlet lips by uttering false words of love.

Sonnet 143: In a rather amusing analogy, Shakespeare says his love is like a frazzled housewife who puts her baby down to chase after a runaway chicken: though the baby cries, the mother's attention is diverted. The poet says his lady is like the busy housewife, and he prays that she'll turn around and kiss him.

Sonnet 145: The sonneteer tells of his chagrin when his love utters the words "I...

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This section contains 1,713 words
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Buy The Sonnets Study Guide
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