The Problems of Philosophy - Chapter 8, How A Priori Knowledge is Possible Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 8, How A Priori Knowledge is Possible Summary and Analysis

Kant is thought to be one of the greatest modern philosophers. He was interested in how a priori knowledge was possible and how we could know things about the world. He also wanted to know whether we could have a priori knowledge of the world rather than just empty "analytic" definitional truths about it. Some prior to Kant thought all a priori knowledge was knowledge by definition. Hume, one of Kant's predecessors, thought this.

Kant wondered how pure mathematics was possible. Empiricists say that it comes from observation, but that seems wrong because we cannot learn exceptionless truths from nature. We can also know the truths of the ideas from a single case. All experience is particular but some knowledge is general.

Kant thought we should distinguish between features...

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