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The Pillow Book of Sei Sh¯onagon, Translated [from the Japanese] and Edited by Ivan Morris Setting & Symbolism

Sei Shōnagon
This Study Guide consists of approximately 41 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, Translated [from the Japanese] and Edited by Ivan Morris.
This section contains 338 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, Translated [from the Japanese] and Edited by Ivan Morris Study Guide

Objects/Places

Gruel-stick

A gruel-stick is a stick that women carry around during the festival of the full-moon gruel. On this day, a bowl of gruel is presented to the Emperor. The women carry the gruel-sticks all day and use them to playfully hit other people. Shonagon describes this as very flirtatious, although she says that when women get hit with gruel-sticks, they often act like they're angry or hurt.

Palm-leaf Carriage

A palm-leaf carriage is a dignified mode of transportation, and Shonagon believes it should be driven slowly to emphasize its dignity. She is annoyed when she sees palm-leaf carriages moving quickly.

Wickerwork Carriage

A wickerwork carriage is less impressive than a palm-leaf carriage and arouses little interest. Therefore, Shonagon believes that wickerwork carriages should be driven quickly because she becomes bored if she has to watch one for very long.

Paper Fans

Paper fans are somewhat disposable, so...

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This section contains 338 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, Translated [from the Japanese] and Edited by Ivan Morris Study Guide
Copyrights
The Pillow Book of Sei Sh¯onagon, Translated [from the Japanese] and Edited by Ivan Morris from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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