The Oath: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court - Chapters 5-6, The Ballad of Lilly Ledbetter, The War Against Precedent Summary & Analysis

Jeffrey Toobin
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Roberts was also shaped by the cases he argued before the SCOTUS, specifically in the case of Lujan v. National Wildlife Federation, which he won by using procedural objections to block a review of important "public interest" laws like civil rights and environmental protections. Conservatives tend to like procedural rules to prevent cases from being heard. Roberts became a constitutional lawyer when procedural doctrines were more controversial. The Warren Court wanted to push the law into new fields and create new rights. Procedural rules limited their power, which Roberts strongly believed in given his and other conservatives' reaction to Harvard Professor Abram Chayes, who celebrated an aggressive court. And in one of Roberts's early decisions as chief justice gave him a chance to appeal to...

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This section contains 568 words
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Buy The Oath: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court Study Guide
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The Oath: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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