Rodman Philbrick Writing Styles in The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg

This Study Guide consists of approximately 21 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg.
This section contains 576 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg Study Guide

Point of View

The point of view of this novel is first person. The novel is told as though Homer P. Figg is an older child, perhaps in his late teens, and has decided to tell the story of his adventures during the Civil War. There are times in which Homer refers to events that have not yet taken place and mentions what other characters have said to him since his adventures ended about those adventures.

The point of view of this novel is highly intimate, allowing the reader to get to know the main character well enough that they care what might happen to him at the end of the novel. However, there are times in which the reader must wonder if the narrator is unreliable. The reader must recall that Homer is a notorious liar; therefore, it stands to reason that some of his story might be...

(read more)

This section contains 576 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.