Study Guide

The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America - Part 5, Chapter 14 Pluralisms, Section 3 Summary & Analysis

Louis Menand
This Study Guide consists of approximately 79 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Metaphysical Club.
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Part 5, Chapter 14 Pluralisms, Section 3 Summary

Horace Kallen was born in Germany and moved with his family to the United States when he was five years old. He worked at Harvard as a teaching assistant and in 1907, he receive a fellowship to study at Oxford.

Kallen had been raised a Jew, but gave up his religion to be an American. An English professor at Harvard explained to him that being a Jew was being an American. Kallen regained his religion and came up with a dual identity theory.

Alain Locke was a black student at Harvard. He did not associate with blacks because he did not want to accept he was black. He had been an extraordinary student in predominantly white schools throughout his education. Kallen, who thought Locke would be interested in his dual identity theory, befriended him.

Locke received a fellowship...

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This section contains 575 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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