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Christina Stead Writing Styles in The Man Who Loved Children

This Study Guide consists of approximately 35 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Man Who Loved Children.
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Point of View

The point of view used in The Man Who Loved Children by Christina Stead is third person omniscient. The third person point of view works well in the novel due to the diverse nature of the characters, particularly the parents versus the children as well as the outside opinions and observations of people like Auntie Jo or Bert. Third person omniscient allows the reader to be able to experience all of the story, giving a more detailed and thorough description of people, places and events that would not be accessible through the first person point of view.

This is especially important due to the clash in cultures and social standings. One good example can be seen in the way Henny views the people around her because she is an heiress. It does not matter in Henny's mind that her clothes are shabby and the house is...

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This section contains 908 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Man Who Loved Children Study Guide
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